BBC's Dracula adaptation implies the vampire sleeps with both men and women

It’s the exciting new BBC adaptation of the Bram Stoker classic.

And the new take on Dracula seems to suggest the blood-sucking count is interested in both sexes, as it features a scene where human Jonathan Harker is questioned about ‘having intercourse’ with the Nosferatu.

According to The Telegraph on Thursday, the first episode opens with the character being asked by the ‘Atheist Nun’ about his night in the vampire’s castle, as she inquires: ‘Did you have intercourse with Count Dracula?’

'Dracula has always fed off men and women': New BBC adaptation implies the vampire sleeps with both sexes, it was reported on Thursday

‘Dracula has always fed off men and women’: New BBC adaptation implies the vampire sleeps with both sexes, it was reported on Thursday

Interested: The Telegraph claimed it opens with Jonathan Harker being questioned about his night in Dracula's castle, as a nun asks: 'Did you have intercourse with Count Dracula?'

Interested: The Telegraph claimed it opens with Jonathan Harker being questioned about his night in Dracula’s castle, as a nun asks: ‘Did you have intercourse with Count Dracula?’

She then refers to a ‘contagion’ that the Count gives to his victims that puts them in an ‘incurable’ state of desire.

Despite the insinuated transgressions, co-creator Steven Moffat claimed during a screening in London that Dracula’s interest was purely predatory: ‘He’s not actually having sex with anyone. 

‘He’s drinking their blood. You might need to delete your Tinder, if that is what you think. Dracula has always fed off men and women.’

More to come: Viewers will meet a new female character called Dorabella (Lily Dodsworth-Evans)

More to come: Viewers will meet a new female character called Dorabella (Lily Dodsworth-Evans)

Little is known about Dracula author Stoker’s own sexuality, but the vampire’s implied promiscuity with both sexes appears to reflect recent theories that the writer was homosexual.

A fiercely private man, Stoker was close with Oscar Wilde, and even went on to marry his former love Florence Balcombe in 1878, but it has since been hypothesised that the author was gay.

In 2011, the author’s private journal was found by his great-grandson Noel Dobbs, and his cousin Dacre Stoker, a professor in South Carolina, wrote a book about his famous ancestor based on the journal soon after.

Claims: Little is known about Dracula author Stoker's own sexuality, but the vampire's implied promiscuity with both sexes appears to reflect recent theories that the writer was homosexual

Claims: Little is known about Dracula author Stoker’s own sexuality, but the vampire’s implied promiscuity with both sexes appears to reflect recent theories that the writer was homosexual

Theory: A private man, Stoker was close with Oscar Wilde and even married his former love Florence Balcombe, but it has been claimed that he had an erotic relationship with the author

Theory: A private man, Stoker was close with Oscar Wilde and even married his former love Florence Balcombe, but it has been claimed that he had an erotic relationship with the author 

Admitting that the journal held ‘very few truly personal comments’, Dacre said in the introduction: ‘A careful reading of the entries in light of what we do know about Bram's life and relationships reveals much more than initially meets the eye.’

While author Talia Schaffer wrote an academic journal about ‘the homoerotic history of Dracula’, in which she claimed Stoker fell in love at first sight with actor Henry Irving, and had an erotic relationship with Wilde.

She also claimed Stoker identified with widespread homophobia in the wake of Wilde’s imprisonment ‘partly to disguise his own vulnerability as a gay man’ and to justify his belief ‘in the value of the closet.’ 

Analysis: Author Talia Schaffer claimed Stoker identified with homophobia in the wake of Wilde's imprisonment 'partly to disguise his own vulnerability as a gay man'

Analysis: Author Talia Schaffer claimed Stoker identified with homophobia in the wake of Wilde’s imprisonment ‘partly to disguise his own vulnerability as a gay man’

This comes after Steven’s co-creator Mark Gatiss appeared on Wednesday’s edition of Lorraine to discuss the show, where he claimed they had created a ‘dark, sexy’ version of the iconic villain.

Of the story’s enduring legacy, he explained: ‘I think there's a vampire myth in almost every culture it must mean something, just the fear of being fed upon or our blood being drained you can interpret it endlessly.

‘The version of Dracula we’ve arrived at is a public decision, it's a combination of Bram stoker’s book and the play by Hamilton Deane. Dracula is a much more dark, sexy figure than Nosferatu now.’

Violent: Despite the insinuated transgressions, Steven Moffat claimed during a screening in London that Dracula's interest was purely predatory as he's 'drinking their blood'

Violent: Despite the insinuated transgressions, Steven Moffat claimed during a screening in London that Dracula’s interest was purely predatory as he’s ‘drinking their blood’

Not the case: Of the claims, Steven hit back, 'You might need to delete your Tinder, if that is what you think. Dracula has always fed off men and women'

Not the case: Of the claims, Steven hit back, ‘You might need to delete your Tinder, if that is what you think. Dracula has always fed off men and women’

Mark also went on to say that lead star Claes Bang ‘had all the same problems Christopher Lee had’ during filming as ‘his contacts hurt, his fangs hurt, [and] his cape got in the way.’

Last month the duo told Radio Times magazine that the mini-series is ‘not for kids’ because of its gore.

The former Doctor Who showrunner said: ‘This is not for kids. Any kid who stays up to watch it will be properly frightened, but it won't disturb them – it's cracking good fun.’ 

New take: Steven's co-creator Mark Gatiss appeared on Wednesday's edition of Lorraine to discuss the show, where he claimed they had created a 'dark, sexy' version of the iconic villain

New take: Steven’s co-creator Mark Gatiss appeared on Wednesday’s edition of Lorraine to discuss the show, where he claimed they had created a ‘dark, sexy’ version of the iconic villain

Trials: Mark also said that lead star Claes Bang 'had all the same problems Christopher Lee had' during filming as 'his contacts hurt, his fangs hurt, [and] his cape got in the way'

Trials: Mark also said that lead star Claes Bang ‘had all the same problems Christopher Lee had’ during filming as ‘his contacts hurt, his fangs hurt, [and] his cape got in the way’

While Mark also supported the horror on show, as he added: ‘We're just pleased it's as gory as it is. It's certainly not underselling the fact that it's Dracula. And that fingernail shot is what gets everyone – without exception.’

Kicking off in Transylvania in 1897, the three-part series sees the bloodthirsty Count Dracula travel from his hometown to London, leaving a trail of corpses in his wake.

The three-part Dracula series begins airing on BBC One on New Year’s Day at 9pm. 

Dark: Mark supported the horror on show, as he added: 'We're just pleased it's as gory as it is'

Dark: Mark supported the horror on show, as he added: ‘We're just pleased it's as gory as it is’

Out soon: The three-part Dracula series begins airing on BBC One on New Year's Day at 9pm

Out soon: The three-part Dracula series begins airing on BBC One on New Year’s Day at 9pm

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